Photos

A visual tour of ELCA congregations, people and events.


The sacrament of Baptism

Jan 13, 2014

For Lutherans, Baptism is one of two sacraments — an act instituted by God. Baptism is necessary because God's word both commands that we baptize and promises life.

The sacrament of Baptism

The font at Christ the King Church in Houston is at the entrance to the nave to remind all who enter that we come to the assembly by way of our baptism.

The sacrament of Baptism

The baptismal candle is lit from the Christ candle at Peace Lutheran Church in Tomah, Wis.

The sacrament of Baptism

Mawien Ariik, pastor, baptizes an adult at a worship service of the Sudanese Lutheran Church in Minnesota in Anoka, Minn.

The sacrament of Baptism

The pastor and assistant pastor of Light of the World Lutheran Church, Farmington, Minn. during an infant baptism.

The sacrament of Baptism

A young boy is baptized at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, Springfield, Va.

The sacrament of Baptism

Baptism at the 2012 Easter Vigil at Atonement Lutheran Church in Racine, Wis. Participating were members from Atonement, Emmaus, St. Andrew, Our Savior's and Emmanuel Lutheran congregations.

Epiphany

Jan 06, 2014

The word “epiphany” comes from the Greek word “ἐπιφάνεια,” meaning "appearance" or "showing forth.” It names the day that the church tells Matthew’s story of the magi from foreign lands who follow the light of the star and thus see Jesus as Christ. We celebrate the Epiphany of Our Lord on Jan. 6.

Epiphany

“The Magi Journeying (Les rois mages en voyage),” by James Tissot, 1886-1894. Brooklyn Museum.

Epiphany

“The Adoration of the Magi” by Nicola Pisano, 1260. Panel from the pulpit of the Duomo, Siena, Italy.

Epiphany

“The Three Kings, kneeling with gifts” by Joseph Christian Leyendecker, 1900.

Epiphany

“The Adoration of the Magi,” by He Qi, China, 2001.

Epiphany

“The Magi,” a mosaic from a late 6th century at the Basilica of Sant'Apollinare Nuovo in Ravenna, Italy.

Epiphany

“The Adoration of the Magi” by Marcelo Barros.

Epiphany

One of the earliest known depictions of the magi from a 2nd century sarcophagus, Vatican Museums, Rome.

Happy New Year!

Jan 01, 2014

Grace and peace to you from your colleagues at Living Lutheran! As we continue to celebrate the coming of the Christ child and embrace a new year, leaders of the ELCA extend to you and your congregation a special greeting. “Eternal God, you have placed us in a world of space and time, and through the events of our lives you bless us with your love. Grant that in the new year we may know your presence, see your love at work, and live in the light of the event that gives us joy forever — the coming of your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen.” (Evangelical Lutheran Worship, p. 63) .

Happy New Year

“Each new year is a gift — a wonderful reminder of God’s grace. We have nothing to bring about the new year. It is given and we receive it. Be thankful. May your new year be blessed!” — Elizabeth Eaton, ELCA presiding bishop

Happy New Year

“The new year always brings promise and hope as we begin a new year. We have a feeling that the slate has been wiped clean, and we are starting new. In baptism God gives us newness every day. May 2014 be the year in which we live in that daily promise to the glory of God and the life of the world.” — Chris Boerger, ELCA secretary

Happy New Year

“The coming of a new year offers us an opportunity to start fresh — a renewal of sorts. It's the same feeling I get every time I recite the prayer of confession and take communion. It's a new canvas, and, from that point, it's what you make of it. May your canvas for the new year be filled with beauty, love and joy!” — Carlos Peña, ELCA vice president

Happy New Year

“Our theme for the anniversary year of the ELCA has been “Always being made new.” Now that 25 years have come and gone, we are still being made new. Whether it is Jan. 1 or Sept. 11, whether it is July 4 or June 19, we are always being made new in Christ. Thanks be to God.” — Jessica Crist, bishop of the ELCA Montana Synod and chair of the ELCA Conference of Bishops

Breaking new ground in Jordan

Dec 30, 2013

Members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Jordan and the Holy Land and others will celebrate in January 2014 the opening of the new Evangelical Lutheran Church at Bethany-Beyond-the-Jordan. The denomination represents one of seven Christian church bodies given land by the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. Members of the church and others broke ground Jan. 6, 2012, and celebrated with a Service of Holy Communion by the Jordan River. Below are images from that service and the groundbreaking. The ELCA and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Jordan and the Holy Land are members of The Lutheran World Federation, a communion representing more than 70 million Christians in the world.

Jordan baptismal site

The site contains a church, pastor’s house and multipurpose hall.

Jordan baptismal site

The Rev. Munib A. Younan (right), bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Jordan and the Holy Land and president of The Lutheran World Federation, presided. Other worship leaders included the Rev. Mitri Raheb (center), Evangelical Lutheran Christmas Church in Bethlehem, and the Rev. Samer Azar, Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd in Amman, Jordan.

Jordan baptismal site

Pastor Raheb distributes communion.

Jordan baptismal site

Though Palestinian Christians have been in the Holy Land since the first Pentecost, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Jordan and the Holy Land traces its roots to the mid-19th century when German and English missionaries came to teach. Today the denomination has six congregations in Jerusalem, Ramallah, Bethlehem, Beit Sahour, Beit Jala and Amman.

Jordan baptismal site

The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Jordan and the Holy Land maintains an active women’s ministry.

Jordan baptismal site

Pastors of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Jordan and the Holy Land and others break ground for the new baptismal site.

Jordan baptismal site

The new Evangelical Lutheran Church at Bethany-Beyond-the-Jordan will be the first Lutheran church on a holy site.

Jordan baptismal site

Christians of all denominations are invited to enjoy and worship at the facilities.

Christmas programs

Dec 23, 2013

Part of this church’s tradition are the annual Christmas programs that congregations across the country take part in at this time of the year. Here are but a few of the memories from this year’s programs.

Children programs

Intergenerational Christmas program at Gethsemane Lutheran Church, Columbus, Ohio.

Children programs

Children’s program from the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Jordan and the Holy Land.

Children programs

Grace Place Children’s Christmas program from Living Grace Lutheran Church, Omaha, Neb.

Children programs

Toward the end of the program at Epiphany Lutheran Church, Eagle Lake, Minn.

Children programs

Mary and Baby Jesus, played by Lindsey Youngblood and her 7-month-old son, Logan, during the manger scene that concluded the play Sunday evening at St. Peter's Lutheran Church in Ander, Texas.

Accompanying the church in China

Dec 16, 2013

From India to Myanmar, Lutheran churches continue to explore what it means to be Lutheran and how to witness to the good news of Jesus Christ. In countries such as China, a broader Protestant identity has taken shape and is growing at a rapid pace. More Chinese are in church on a given Sunday than in all of Europe. The post-denominational China Christian Council, the church’s national expression, coordinates theological education, social services and resource publishing for millions of Protestants in China. The photos below have been contributed by Y. Franklin Ishida, ELCA area program director for the Asia and Pacific regions. Taken during his November 2013 visit to China, the photos share some of the ways in which the ELCA accompanies Chinese Christians.

china

Children from the Lisu ethnic minority village of Meile in the northern Yunnan Province of China have fewer education resources compared to their counterparts in urban areas. An ELCA World Hunger grant provided computers for this school, giving children a level playing field when they go to high school (boarding schools in larger towns down the valley.)

China

Leaders from congregations of the Ninglang parish in the northern Yunnan Province sing at a thanksgiving service. Members of this parish come from various ethnic groups: Han (Mandarin), Lisu, Mosuo and Yi. ELCA funds provide for lay leadership training that helps build community and growth in the church.

china

Lijiang, in northern Yunnan Province, is home to some 120,000 Lisu ethnic minority peoples. Further north, nestled in the mountains, is the village of Liming (pictured here), one of the Lisu centers. Many Lisu are Christian and their faith is encouraged as an expression of their culture.

china

A rebuilt Wujihou Gospel Church, up the road from Liming in northern Yunnan, was dedicated on Nov. 22, 2013. Built with financial assistance from the ELCA, it incorporates elements of Lisu culture and replaces an older, crumbling building. On Sundays, members often walk three or more hours to come to church, where they remain all day in worship and fellowship.

china

The Miao ethnic minority in China carry on traditions of family and the Christian faith, often under difficult circumstances, which include lack of road access and poverty. This extended family, living in the mountain community of Fengyi south of Yibin, Sichuan Province, is eagerly awaiting the construction of their church, having worshiped for a long time in their homes.

china

Peter Shen, ELCA China consultant, (second from the left) and Rafael Malpica Padilla, executive director for ELCA Global Mission (far right) discuss plans with local church leaders. The plans are for a new church to be built in Meile village in northern Yunnan. The grounds will include a broad outdoor square, allowing for community gatherings and dances, all part of the local Lisu culture.

china

Feng Wen-guang first went to church to discover what gave his wife such joy as a Christian. He felt God calling him when he heard Paul’s words that in Christ, there is a new creation (2 Corinthians 5:17). He now leads the Lijiang church at the county level as a lay elder. Even though he is losing his eyesight, he has found great joy, comfort and support through the congregation.

china

The Protestant church in China is growing fast, whether it be in urban areas or the far reaches of the country, such as here, close to the legendary Shangri-La and along the upper Yangtze River in northern Yunnan Province. It is here that the ELCA accompanies the Lisu ethnic minority community and the church in rural development and church leadership training.

china

Chao Wan-shen lives in the mountains above Meile and Liming in Yunnan where he raises goats provided by an ELCA World Hunger grant. Improved goat breeds bring greater income and are an incentive for people like Chao to stay on the land instead of migrating to cities, thus maintaining ethnic Lisu cultural ties with the land and people.