Pottery Makes a Difference - Near and Far!

Allison Beebe

Pottery projects are supporting the work of the ELCA Malaria Campaign, both here in the US and abroad in Africa. Recently, we wrote about Juma Sumahil​, who received a grant from the Lutheran Malaria Program in Mozambique. This grant helped him to begin his malaria-fighting small business: he makes pottery. Juma Sumahil is a participant in the Lutheran Malaria Program in Mozambique, which is funded by the ELCA Malaria Campaign. With the grant he received, Juma purchased a kickwheel and built a kiln in his backyard. By selling his pottery, Juma generates income for his household. His pottery creations also have an impact on his neighbors. Juma's water jugs always come with covers–a barrier to prevent mosquitoes from laying their eggs in the standing water inside the jug. Juma also creates ceramic water filters, which protect his neighbors from water-borne diseases. Juma's business generates income and promotes good health throughout his community. 

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Half-a-world-away, Trinty Lutheran Church in LaTrobe, Pennsylvania is also using pottery in the fight against malaria. Pastor Fred Opalinski and another Trinity member, Bruce Ilgen, are selling beautiful pottery that they have crafted. Pieces for sale are on display at their church, and the proceeds with benefit malaria work in Africa. "Most of the money we've sent in has come from 'Trinity Pottery'," says Pastor Opalinski. "We've been delighted with congregational and other local support.  It's great having an outlet for the pottery and especially good knowing that it's saving lives!" Thanks to Pastor Opalinski, Bruce Ilgen and all of the community members who have contributed to the success of "Trinity Pottery." 

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